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Multilevel linear models in Stata, part 2: Longitudinal data

In my last posting, I introduced you to the concepts of hierarchical or “multilevel” data. In today’s post, I’d like to show you how to use multilevel modeling techniques to analyse longitudinal data with Stata’s xtmixed command.

Last time, we noticed that our data had two features. First, we noticed that the means within each level of the hierarchy were different from each other and we incorporated that into our data analysis by fitting a “variance component” model using Stata’s xtmixed command.

The second feature that we noticed is that repeated measurement of GSP showed an upward trend. We’ll pick up where we left off last time and stick to the concepts again and you can refer to the references at the end to learn more about the details.

The videos

Stata has a very friendly dialog box that can assist you in building multilevel models. If you would like a brief introduction using the GUI, you can watch a demonstration on Stata’s YouTube Channel:

Introduction to multilevel linear models in Stata, part 2: Longitudinal data

Longitudinal data

I’m often asked by beginning data analysts – “What’s the difference between longitudinal data and time-series data? Aren’t they the same thing?”.

The confusion is understandable — both types of data involve some measurement of time. But the answer is no, they are not the same thing.

Univariate time series data typically arise from the collection of many data points over time from a single source, such as from a person, country, financial instrument, etc.

Longitudinal data typically arise from collecting a few observations over time from many sources, such as a few blood pressure measurements from many people.

There are some multivariate time series that blur this distinction but a rule of thumb for distinguishing between the two is that time series have more repeated observations than subjects while longitudinal data have more subjects than repeated observations.

Because our GSP data from last time involve 17 measurements from 48 states (more sources than measurements), we will treat them as longitudinal data.

GSP Data: http://www.stata-press.com/data/r12/productivity.dta

Random intercept models

As I mentioned last time, repeated observations on a group of individuals can be conceptualized as multilevel data and modeled just as any other multilevel data. We left off last time with a variance component model for GSP (Gross State Product, logged) and noted that our model assumed a constant GSP over time while the data showed a clear upward trend.

Graph3

If we consider a single observation and think about our model, nothing in the fixed or random part of the models is a function of time.

Slide15

Let’s begin by adding the variable year to the fixed part of our model.

Slide16

As we expected, our grand mean has become a linear regression which more accurately reflects the change over time in GSP. What might be unexpected is that each state’s and region’s mean has changed as well and now has the same slope as the regression line. This is because none of the random components of our model are a function of time. Let’s fit this model with the xtmixed command:

. xtmixed gsp year, || region: || state:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         gsp |      Coef.   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
        year |   .0274903   .0005247    52.39   0.000     .0264618    .0285188
       _cons |  -43.71617   1.067718   -40.94   0.000    -45.80886   -41.62348
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Random-effects Parameters  |   Estimate   Std. Err.     [95% Conf. Interval]
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
region: Identity             |
                   sd(_cons) |   .6615238   .2038949      .3615664    1.210327
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
state: Identity              |
                   sd(_cons) |   .7805107   .0885788      .6248525    .9749452
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
                sd(Residual) |   .0734343   .0018737      .0698522    .0772001
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The fixed part of our model now displays an estimate of the intercept (_cons = -43.7) and the slope (year = 0.027). Let’s graph the model for Region 7 and see if it fits the data better than the variance component model.

predict GrandMean, xb
label var GrandMean "GrandMean"
predict RegionEffect, reffects level(region)
predict StateEffect, reffects level(state)
gen RegionMean = GrandMean + RegionEffect
gen StateMean = GrandMean + RegionEffect + StateEffect

twoway  (line GrandMean year, lcolor(black) lwidth(thick))      ///
        (line RegionMean year, lcolor(blue) lwidth(medthick))   ///
        (line StateMean year, lcolor(green) connect(ascending)) ///
        (scatter gsp year, mcolor(red) msize(medsmall))         ///
        if region ==7,                                          ///
        ytitle(log(Gross State Product), margin(medsmall))      ///
        legend(cols(4) size(small))                             ///
        title("Multilevel Model of GSP for Region 7", size(medsmall))

Graph4

That looks like a much better fit than our variance-components model from last time. Perhaps I should leave well enough alone, but I can’t help noticing that the slopes of the green lines for each state don’t fit as well as they could. The top green line fits nicely but the second from the top looks like it slopes upward more than is necessary. That’s the best fit we can achieve if the regression lines are forced to be parallel to each other. But what if the lines were not forced to be parallel? What if we could fit a “mini-regression model” for each state within the context of my overall multilevel model. Well, good news — we can!

Random slope models

By introducing the variable year to the fixed part of the model, we turned our grand mean into a regression line. Next I’d like to incorporate the variable year into the random part of the model. By introducing a fourth random component that is a function of time, I am effectively estimating a separate regression line within each state.

Slide19

Notice that the size of the new, brown deviation u1ij. is a function of time. If the observation were one year to the left, u1ij. would be smaller and if the observation were one year to the right, u1ij.would be larger.

It is common to “center” the time variable before fitting these kinds of models. Explaining why is for another day. The quick answer is that, at some point during the fitting of the model, Stata will have to compute the equivalent of the inverse of the square of year. For the year 1986 this turns out to be 2.535e-07. That’s a fairly small number and if we multiply it by another small number…well, you get the idea. By centering age (e.g. cyear = year – 1978), we get a more reasonable number for 1986 (0.01). (Hint: If you have problems with your model converging and you have large values for time, try centering them. It won’t always help, but it might).

So let’s center our year variable by subtracting 1978 and fit a model that includes a random slope.

gen cyear = year - 1978
xtmixed gsp cyear, || region: || state: cyear, cov(indep)

Slide21

I’ve color-coded the output so that we can match each part of the output back to the model and the graph. The fixed part of the model appears in the top table and it looks like any other simple linear regression model. The random part of the model is definitely more complicated. If you get lost, look back at the graphic of the deviations and remind yourself that we have simply partitioned the deviation of each observation into four components. If we did this for every observation, the standard deviations in our output are simply the average of those deviations.

Let’s look at a graph of our new “random slope” model for Region 7 and see how well it fits our data.

predict GrandMean, xb
label var GrandMean "GrandMean"
predict RegionEffect, reffects level(region)
predict StateEffect_year StateEffect_cons, reffects level(state)

gen RegionMean = GrandMean + RegionEffect
gen StateMean_cons = GrandMean + RegionEffect + StateEffect_cons
gen StateMean_year = GrandMean + RegionEffect + StateEffect_cons + ///
                     (cyear*StateEffect_year)

twoway  (line GrandMean cyear, lcolor(black) lwidth(thick))             ///
        (line RegionMean cyear, lcolor(blue) lwidth(medthick))          ///
        (line StateMean_cons cyear, lcolor(green) connect(ascending))   ///
        (line StateMean_year cyear, lcolor(brown) connect(ascending))   ///
        (scatter gsp cyear, mcolor(red) msize(medsmall))                ///
        if region ==7,                                                  ///
        ytitle(log(Gross State Product), margin(medsmall))              ///
        legend(cols(3) size(small))                                     ///
        title("Multilevel Model of GSP for Region 7", size(medsmall))

Graph6

The top brown line fits the data slightly better, but the brown line below it (second from the top) is a much better fit. Mission accomplished!

Where do we go from here?

I hope I have been able to convince you that multilevel modeling is easy using Stata’s xtmixed command and that this is a tool that you will want to add to your kit. I would love to say something like “And that’s all there is to it. Go forth and build models!”, but I would be remiss if I didn’t point out that I have glossed over many critical topics.

In our GSP example, we would still like to consider the impact of other independent variables. I haven’t mentioned choice of estimation methods (ML or REML in the case of xtmixed). I’ve assessed the fit of our models by looking at graphs, an approach important but incomplete. We haven’t thought about hypothesis testing. Oh — and, all the usual residual diagnostics for linear regression such as checking for outliers, influential observations, heteroskedasticity and normality still apply….times four! But now that you understand the concepts and some of the mechanics, it shouldn’t be difficult to fill in the details. If you’d like to learn more, check out the links below.

I hope this was helpful…thanks for stopping by.

For more information

If you’d like to learn more about modeling multilevel and longitudinal data, check out

Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Third Edition
Volume I: Continuous Responses
Volume II: Categorical Responses, Counts, and Survival
by Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and Anders Skrondal

or sign up for our popular public training course Multilevel/Mixed Models Using Stata.

Multilevel linear models in Stata, part 1: Components of variance

In the last 15-20 years multilevel modeling has evolved from a specialty area of statistical research into a standard analytical tool used by many applied researchers.

Stata has a lot of multilevel modeling capababilities.

I want to show you how easy it is to fit multilevel models in Stata. Along the way, we’ll unavoidably introduce some of the jargon of multilevel modeling.

I’m going to focus on concepts and ignore many of the details that would be part of a formal data analysis. I’ll give you some suggestions for learning more at the end of the post.

    The videos

Stata has a friendly dialog box that can assist you in building multilevel models. If you would like a brief introduction using the GUI, you can watch a demonstration on Stata’s YouTube Channel:

Introduction to multilevel linear models in Stata, part 1: The xtmixed command

    Multilevel data

Multilevel data are characterized by a hierarchical structure. A classic example is children nested within classrooms and classrooms nested within schools. The test scores of students within the same classroom may be correlated due to exposure to the same teacher or textbook. Likewise, the average test scores of classes might be correlated within a school due to the similar socioeconomic level of the students.

You may have run across datasets with these kinds of structures in your own work. For our example, I would like to use a dataset that has both longitudinal and classical hierarchical features. You can access this dataset from within Stata by typing the following command:

use http://www.stata-press.com/data/r12/productivity.dta

We are going to build a model of gross state product for 48 states in the USA measured annually from 1970 to 1986. The states have been grouped into nine regions based on their economic similarity. For distributional reasons, we will be modeling the logarithm of annual Gross State Product (GSP) but in the interest of readability, I will simply refer to the dependent variable as GSP.

. describe gsp year state region

              storage  display     value
variable name   type   format      label      variable label
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
gsp             float  %9.0g                  log(gross state product)
year            int    %9.0g                  years 1970-1986
state           byte   %9.0g                  states 1-48
region          byte   %9.0g                  regions 1-9

Let’s look at a graph of these data to see what we’re working with.

twoway (line gsp year, connect(ascending)), ///
        by(region, title("log(Gross State Product) by Region", size(medsmall)))

graph1

Each line represents the trajectory of a state’s (log) GSP over the years 1970 to 1986. The first thing I notice is that the groups of lines are different in each of the nine regions. Some groups of lines seem higher and some groups seem lower. The second thing that I notice is that the slopes of the lines are not the same. I’d like to incorporate those attributes of the data into my model.

    Components of variance

Let’s tackle the vertical differences in the groups of lines first. If we think about the hierarchical structure of these data, I have repeated observations nested within states which are in turn nested within regions. I used color to keep track of the data hierarchy.

slide2

We could compute the mean GSP within each state and note that the observations within in each state vary about their state mean.

slide3

Likewise, we could compute the mean GSP within each region and note that the state means vary about their regional mean.

slide4

We could also compute a grand mean and note that the regional means vary about the grand mean.

slide5

Next, let’s introduce some notation to help us keep track of our mutlilevel structure. In the jargon of multilevel modelling, the repeated measurements of GSP are described as “level 1″, the states are referred to as “level 2″ and the regions are “level 3″. I can add a three-part subscript to each observation to keep track of its place in the hierarchy.

slide7

Now let’s think about our model. The simplest regression model is the intercept-only model which is equivalent to the sample mean. The sample mean is the “fixed” part of the model and the difference between the observation and the mean is the residual or “random” part of the model. Econometricians often prefer the term “disturbance”. I’m going to use the symbol μ to denote the fixed part of the model. μ could represent something as simple as the sample mean or it could represent a collection of independent variables and their parameters.

slide8

Each observation can then be described in terms of its deviation from the fixed part of the model.

slide9

If we computed this deviation of each observation, we could estimate the variability of those deviations. Let’s try that for our data using Stata’s xtmixed command to fit the model:

. xtmixed gsp

Mixed-effects ML regression                     Number of obs      =       816

                                                Wald chi2(0)       =         .
Log likelihood = -1174.4175                     Prob > chi2        =         .

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         gsp |      Coef.   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
       _cons |   10.50885   .0357249   294.16   0.000     10.43883    10.57887
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Random-effects Parameters  |   Estimate   Std. Err.     [95% Conf. Interval]
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
                sd(Residual) |   1.020506   .0252613      .9721766    1.071238
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The top table in the output shows the fixed part of the model which looks like any other regression output from Stata, and the bottom table displays the random part of the model. Let’s look at a graph of our model along with the raw data and interpret our results.

predict GrandMean, xb
label var GrandMean "GrandMean"
twoway  (line GrandMean year, lcolor(black) lwidth(thick))              ///
        (scatter gsp year, mcolor(red) msize(tiny)),                    ///
        ytitle(log(Gross State Product), margin(medsmall))              ///
        legend(cols(4) size(small))                                     ///
        title("GSP for 1970-1986 by Region", size(medsmall))

graph1b

The thick black line in the center of the graph is the estimate of _cons, which is an estimate of the fixed part of model for GSP. In this simple model, _cons is the sample mean which is equal to 10.51. In “Random-effects Parameters” section of the output, sd(Residual) is the average vertical distance between each observation (the red dots) and fixed part of the model (the black line). In this model, sd(Residual) is the estimate of the sample standard deviation which equals 1.02.

At this point you may be thinking to yourself – “That’s not very interesting – I could have done that with Stata’s summarize command”. And you would be correct.

. summ gsp

    Variable |       Obs        Mean    Std. Dev.       Min        Max
-------------+--------------------------------------------------------
         gsp |       816    10.50885    1.021132    8.37885   13.04882

But here’s where it does become interesting. Let’s make the random part of the model more complex to account for the hierarchical structure of the data. Consider a single observation, yijk and take another look at its residual.

slide11

The observation deviates from its state mean by an amount that we will denote eijk. The observation’s state mean deviates from the the regionals mean uij. and the observation’s regional mean deviates from the fixed part of the model, μ, by an amount that we will denote ui... We have partitioned the observation’s residual into three parts, aka “components”, that describe its magnitude relative to the state, region and grand means. If we calculated this set of residuals for each observation, wecould estimate the variability of those residuals and make distributional assumptions about them.

slide12

These kinds of models are often called “variance component” models because they estimate the variability accounted for by each level of the hierarchy. We can estimate a variance component model for GSP using Stata’s xtmixed command:

xtmixed gsp, || region: || state:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         gsp |      Coef.   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
       _cons |   10.65961   .2503806    42.57   0.000     10.16887    11.15035
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Random-effects Parameters  |   Estimate   Std. Err.     [95% Conf. Interval]
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
region: Identity             |   
                   sd(_cons) |   .6615227   .2038944       .361566    1.210325
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
state: Identity              |   
                   sd(_cons) |   .7797837   .0886614      .6240114    .9744415
-----------------------------+------------------------------------------------
                sd(Residual) |   .1570457   .0040071       .149385    .1650992
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The fixed part of the model, _cons, is still the sample mean. But now there are three parameters estimates in the bottom table labeled “Random-effects Parameters”. Each quantifies the average deviation at each level of the hierarchy.

Let’s graph the predictions from our model and see how well they fit the data.

predict GrandMean, xb
label var GrandMean "GrandMean"
predict RegionEffect, reffects level(region)
predict StateEffect, reffects level(state)
gen RegionMean = GrandMean + RegionEffect
gen StateMean = GrandMean + RegionEffect + StateEffect

twoway  (line GrandMean year, lcolor(black) lwidth(thick))      ///
        (line RegionMean year, lcolor(blue) lwidth(medthick))   ///
        (line StateMean year, lcolor(green) connect(ascending)) ///
        (scatter gsp year, mcolor(red) msize(tiny)),            ///
        ytitle(log(Gross State Product), margin(medsmall))      ///
        legend(cols(4) size(small))                             ///
        by(region, title("Multilevel Model of GSP by Region", size(medsmall)))

graph2

Wow – that’s a nice graph if I do say so myself. It would be impressive for a report or publication, but it’s a little tough to read with all nine regions displayed at once. Let’s take a closer look at Region 7 instead.

twoway  (line GrandMean year, lcolor(black) lwidth(thick))      ///
        (line RegionMean year, lcolor(blue) lwidth(medthick))   ///
        (line StateMean year, lcolor(green) connect(ascending)) ///
        (scatter gsp year, mcolor(red) msize(medsmall))         ///
        if region ==7,                                          ///
        ytitle(log(Gross State Product), margin(medsmall))      ///
        legend(cols(4) size(small))                             ///
        title("Multilevel Model of GSP for Region 7", size(medsmall))

graph3

The red dots are the observations of GSP for each state within Region 7. The green lines are the estimated mean GSP within each State and the blue line is the estimated mean GSP within Region 7. The thick black line in the center is the overall grand mean for all nine regions. The model appears to fit the data fairly well but I can’t help noticing that the red dots seem to have an upward slant to them. Our model predicts that GSP is constant within each state and region from 1970 to 1986 when clearly the data show an upward trend.

So we’ve tackled the first feature of our data. We’ve succesfully incorporated the basic hierarchical structure into our model by fitting a variance componentis using Stata’s xtmixed command. But our graph tells us that we aren’t finished yet.

Next time we’ll tackle the second feature of our data — the longitudinal nature of the observations.

    For more information

If you’d like to learn more about modelling multilevel and longitudinal data, check out

Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Third Edition
Volume I: Continuous Responses
Volume II: Categorical Responses, Counts, and Survival
by Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and Anders Skrondal

or sign up for our popular public training course “Multilevel/Mixed Models Using Stata“.

There’s a course coming up in Washington, DC on February 7-8, 2013.