Just released from Stata Press: Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Fourth Edition

Stata Press is pleased to announce the release of Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Volumes I and II, Fourth Edition by Sophia Rabe-Hesketh and Anders Skrondal. This book debuted on the top 10 list for Kindle’s new releases for Probability & Statistics and consistently stayed there for weeks. This book was also on the top 10 list for Kindle’s new releases in Mathematics, competing with many other books. Read more…

Just released from Stata Press: An Introduction to Stata for Health Researchers, Fifth Edition

Stata Press is pleased to announce the release of An Introduction to Stata for Health Researchers, Fifth Edition, by Svend Juul and Morten Frydenberg. This book debuted at #1 on Kindle’s new release list for Probability & Statistics and debuted on the top ten list on Kindle’s new release list for Mathematics. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 7: Saving and using custom styles and labels

In Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 5, I showed you how to use the new and improved table command to create a table of results from a logistic regression model. We are likely to create many more tables of regression results, and we will probably use the same style and labels. In this post, I will show you how to save your styles and labels so that you can use them to format future tables. I will use the Microsoft Word document that we created in part 5 as our goal. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 6: Tables for multiple regression models

In my last post, I showed you how to create a table of statistical tests using the command() option in the new and improved table command. In this post, I will show you how to gather information and create tables using the new collect suite of commands. Our goal is to fit three logistic regression models and create the table in the Adobe PDF document below. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 5: Tables for one regression model

In my last post, I showed you how to use the new and improved table command with the command() option to create a table of statistical tests. In this post, I want to show you how to use the command() option to create a table for a single regression model. Our goal is to create the table in the Microsoft Word document below. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 4: Table of statistical tests

In my last post, I showed you how to use the new and improved table command with the statistic() option to create a classic table 1. In this post, I want to show you how to use the command() option to create a table of statistical tests. Our goal is to create the table in the Microsoft Word document below. Read more…

Calculating power using Monte Carlo simulations, part 5: Structural equation models

In our last four posts in this series, we showed you how to calculate power for a t test using Monte Carlo simulations, how to integrate your simulations into Stata’s power command, and how to do this for linear and logistic regression models and multilevel models. In today’s post, I’m going to show you how to estimate power for structural equation models (SEM) using simulations.

Our goal is to write a program that will calculate power for a given SEM at different sample sizes. We’ll follow the same general procedure as the previous two posts, but the way we’ll go about simulating data is a bit different. Rather than individually simulating each variable for our specified model, we’ll be simulating all our variables simultaneously from a given covariance matrix. Means for each of the variables can also be used to simulate the data if your SEM has a mean structure, such as in group analysis or growth curve analysis. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 3: The classic table 1

In my last two posts, I showed you how to use the new-and-improved table command to create a table and how to use the collect commands to customize and export the table. In this post, I want to show you how to use these tools to create a table of descriptive statistics that is often called a “classic table 1”. Our goal is to create the table in the Microsoft Word document below. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 2: The new collect command

In my last post, I showed you how to use the new-and-improved table command to create a table and how to use some of the options to customize the table. In this post I want to introduce the collect commands. Many Stata commands begin with collect, and they can be used to create collections, customize table layouts, format the numbers in the tables, and export tables to documents. There are so many new collect commands that we created a new Customizable Tables and Collected Results Reference Manual. Today, I want to show you how to use some of the collect commands to customize the look of your tables. I will show you more advanced uses of collect in future posts. Read more…

Customizable tables in Stata 17, part 1: The new table command

Today, I’m going to begin a series of blog posts about customizable tables in Stata 17. We expanded the functionality of the table command. We also developed an entirely new system that allows you to collect results from any Stata command, create custom table layouts and styles, save and use those layouts and styles, and export your tables to most popular document formats. We even added a new manual to show you how to use this powerful and flexible system. Read more…