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Web scraping NBA data into Stata

Since our intern, Chris Hassell, finished nfl2stata earlier than expected, he went ahead and created another command to web scrape https://stats.nba.com for data on the NBA. The command is nba2stata. To install the command type

net install http://www.stata.com/users/kcrow/nba2stata, replace

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Categories: Data Management Tags: ,

Web scraping NFL data into Stata

Football season is around the corner, and I could not be more excited. We have a pretty competitive StataCorp fantasy football league. I’m always looking for an edge in our league, so I challenged one of our interns, Chris Hassell, to write a command to web scrape http://www.nfl.com for data on the NFL. The new command is nfl2stata. To install the command, type

net install http://www.stata.com/users/kcrow/nfl2stata, replace

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Categories: Data Management Tags: ,

Export tabulation results to Excel—Update

It’s summer time, which means we have interns working at StataCorp again. Our newest intern, Chris Hassell, was tasked with updating my community-contributed command tab2xl with most of the suggestions that blog readers left in the comments. Chris updated tab2xl and wrote tab2docx, which writes a tabulation table to a Word file using the putdocx command.
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Importing Facebook data into Stata

In a previous post, we released a new command to import Twitter data into Stata. We have now added another new command, facebook2stata, that imports Facebook data. To install facebook2stata, type

net install https://www.stata.com/users/kcrow/facebook2stata, replace

Read more…

Categories: Data Management Tags: ,

Working with Java plugins (Part 2)

In my previous post, I talked about how to combine the Java library Twitter4J and Stata’s Java function Interface using Eclipse to create a helloWorld plugin. Now, I want to talk about how to call Twitter4j member functions to connect to Twitter REST API, return Twitter data, and load that data into Stata using the Stata SFI. Read more…

Categories: Programming Tags: , ,

Working with Java plugins (Part 1)

Introduction

Three months ago, I wrote about a new command, twitter2stata, that imports data from Twitter’s REST API into Stata. Today, I will show you the tools we used to develop this command. Writing this command from scratch solely in Mata or ado-code would have taken several months. Fortunately, we can significantly speed up our development using an existing Java library (Twitter4J) and Stata’s Java plugins. In this post, I will discuss the basic steps of how to leverage a Java library and the Stata Java API.

Java is the most popular programming language in the world, so there are many libraries to support your development. A quick Google search should tell you if a Java library exists for what you are trying to do; this is how we found the library Twitter4J. For the rest of this blog entry, a basic understanding of programming in Java is helpful, but not necessary. Read more…

Categories: Programming Tags: , ,

Importing WRDS data into Stata

Wharton Research Data Services (WRDS) is a leading research platform and business intelligence tool for 400+ corporate, academic, and government researchers. If your institution subscribes to WRDS, you can now easily access WRDS data remotely via Stata’s odbc command. For questions or subscription information click here. Read more…

Importing Twitter data into Stata

In the past, we’ve had users ask if Stata could import Twitter data. So we asked one of our interns, Dawson Deere (currently working on his computer science degree at Texas A&M University) to see if he could write a new command to do this. He used Stata 15’s improved Java plugins feature to write a new twitter2stata command. To install twitter2stata, type

ssc install twitter2stata, replace

Read more…

Categories: Data Management Tags: ,

Retaining an Excel cell’s format when using putexcel

In a previous blog entry, I talked about the new Stata 13 command putexcel and how we could use putexcel with a Stata command’s stored results to create tables in an Excel file.

After the entry was posted, a few users pointed out two features they wanted added to putexcel:

  1. Retain a cell’s format after writing numeric data to it.
  2. Allow putexcel to format a cell.

In Stata 13.1, we added the new option keepcellformat to putexcel. This option retains a cell’s format after writing numeric data to it. keepcellformat is useful for people who want to automate the updating of a report or paper. Read more…

Categories: Programming Tags: , , , , ,

Export tables to Excel

Update 07 June 2018: See Export tabulation results to Excel—Update for new features that have been added since this original blog.

There is a new command in Stata 13, putexcel, that allows you to easily export matrices, expressions, and stored results to an Excel file. Combining putexcel with a Stata command’s stored results allows you to create the table displayed in your Stata Results window in an Excel file. Read more…

Categories: Programming Tags: , , , ,